Why and when move to a care home?


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  If every effort has been taken to support your elderly relative in their own home (family support network, home care, social worker visits, etc.) and despite all of these physical and financial efforts, the family is no longer capable of providing a satisfactory environment for a loved one who now needs constant care and attention, then perhaps it is time to consider moving into a specialised establishment such as a nursing home.  

How do you know when the time is right to move into a care home?

 

If every effort has been taken to support your elderly relative in their own home (family support network, home care, social worker visits, etc.) and despite all of these physical and financial efforts, the family is no longer capable of providing a satisfactory environment for a loved one who now needs constant care and attention, then perhaps it is time to consider moving into a specialized establishment such as a nursing home.

 

The following golden rule applies in this context. Avoid rushed decisions. Make your choice based on the quality of the service on offer, the location, and the wishes of the elderly person concerned. Generally, the residents who made this decision either alone or with third-party involvement are extremely satisfied with their choice. However, when there is little additional input in the decision-making process, few residents adapt well to their new surroundings.

 

 

Potential trigger factors behind this decision:

 

  • Is there a health issue or loss of independence? Has the individual in question suffered a stroke or have they had a serious fall? 
  • Has there been a family tragedy, such as the loss of a loved one, culminating in the physical and/or mental deterioration of the next of kin?

  • Has an elderly relative been discharged from hospital earlier than expected or do they have to move out of their own home fairly quickly?

 

Other key factors that may tip the balance and accelerate the move to a care home:

 

  • Loneliness and a feeling of isolation in their own home, and

    • a need for social interaction with other residents,

    • participation in various workshops or even outings organized as part of a scheduled, appropriate program of activities where the safety of all residents is of paramount importance.

  • The following medical support packages are available, providing greater security than in the home setting:

    • around-the-clock medical supervision on a daily basis,

    • immediate medical care in the event of a health problem or fall, etc.

    • regular administrative follow-up for individual medical treatment administered,

    • appropriate medical care for specific conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, etc.

  • Management of daily tasks, leaving the resident time to enjoy:

    • greater comfort and healthy, balanced meals prepared by the catering team,

    • all household chores (grocery shopping, cooking, cleaning, washing and ironing, etc.) will be taken care of by staff at the care home.

  • Residents can make the most of assisted living facilities which are more accessible than at home:

    • Assistance is given with washing, dressing, going to the bathroom, and moving around.

  • Residents can stay close to their families by choosing a local facility where family and friends can visit as often as possible.

 

When home care is no longer a viable option?

 

While home care is generally a priority for children, it is generally acknowledged that this constitutes a significant emotional, physical, and financial investment.

It often requires a family member to be available 24/7. Otherwise, the elderly, dependent parent will find it hard to cope with issues that can arise on a daily basis. The individual in question may well become depressed and increasingly introverted. This type of isolation will inevitably take its toll. This is precisely when people consider moving to a care home.

Or should you wait and run the risk of an accident or a fall, which could result in your elderly relative being confined to bed?

Elderly individuals who still enjoy some independence will find it easier to settle into a care home. In this secure environment, where medical back-up is constantly available, your elderly relative will get to know the other residents. They will have a good social life based on a wide selection of age- and health-appropriate activities. This will herald a new and generally beneficial chapter in their life. The greater their independence on entering the care home, the more positively they will adapt to their new environment.

Research shows almost all the elderly, still enjoyed regular activities before entering a care home, were able to travel alone, and were able to run small errands.

In fact, as soon as a parent is no longer able to manage personal hygiene requirements, move around unaided, go shopping, or carry out routine household chores, they lose some self-esteem and often refuse to become a burden for their family. An integrated facility offering an all-around care package, meals in the restaurant with other residents, and afternoons dedicated to leisure and craft activities will change their lives for the better. But the type of accommodation must be chosen with the elderly relative in mind and with their input. It is not a decision to be taken lightly and requires due thought and consideration particularly if their move to a care home comes in the wake of an accident, serious fall, or loss of their partner/loved one.

Already overwhelmed by these life-changing events, your parent will need all your help and support every step of the way as they embark on this new chapter. 

 

We are here to help you choose a care home or facility best suited to your needs. Do not hesitate to contact us on the following number: 0203 608 0055.

 

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